Wednesday, June 24, 2020 at 9:37 AM
INDOOR Masses have begun. Sign up below on "SignUp Genius" Live Streaming Mass is available by clicking the Red "Watch Live" button. Text "OLFWILTON" to 84576 to join flocknote

02/16/20 Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Deacon Tony

Deacon Tony Conti

Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 76

  • From today’s Gospel: “Let your ‘Yes’ mean ‘Yes,’ and your ‘No’ mean ‘No.’
    Anything more is from the evil one
    .”
  • Jesus is telling us to be sincere… to be honest… to be trustworthy… to say what we mean, and mean what we say
  • He’s asking us not to twist our words or our actions to suit our purposes…
  • To live as Jesus lived we need moral courage
  • Moral courage results from the resoluteness to remain faithful to what you know in your heart to be right and just, especially when it’s difficult and may require personal sacrifice
  • It requires us to become like Nathanael in the Gospel of John (1:47) where Jesus says - “There is no duplicity in him.
  • Someone once observed that “…moral courage is (often) a rarer commodity than bravery in battle.”  (Robert Kennedy, Day of affirmation Address, University of Capetown, South Africa June 6, 1966)
  • Jesus was a man of moral courage
  • The courage to stand by His principles and beliefs despite the ridicule and disdain from His peers...
  • He was able to let go of our human need for approval and live in favor of being true to Himself and Who He was...
  • When we look around at our nation and our world today, we may sometimes ask ourselves where has our moral courage gone?
  • How have we become so callous and calculating?
  • How has winning at any cost become the norm?
  • At times it may seem that we’ve turned the corner as a people and are rapidly heading down the wrong road...
  • The road of ruthlessness and opportunism...
  • The road of hatred and vindictiveness...
  • The road where the end can now justify the means
  • Where are the men and women who will defend truth, and justice… who will promote the values of compassion, and mercy, and civility?
  • Where are the men and women who will stand with the moral courage necessary to drown-out the shouts of the angry crowd?...
  • Truth be told – They’re out there – But they need our help and support…
  • We’re reminded daily of the words of the eighteenth century Irish statesman Edmund Burke who wrote: “The only thing necessary for evil to triumph is for good men (and women) to do nothing.”
  • None of this gives us a license to hate... as Christians Jesus is always our example...
  • Jesus showed us how to disagree without becoming disagreeable... He showed us how to overcome evil without becoming evil...
  • Moral courage is what we’re all called-to as practicing Christians... It’s not optional...
  • Moral courage requires a belief in something and someone bigger than ourselves...
  • It requires a conviction that what we stand for is worth suffering for...
  • It requires our yes to be yes and our no to be no...
  • It requires us to draw lines in our lives that we refuse to cross...
  • It requires a strong will and a stubbornness to persist despite the obstacles...
  • As we approach Lent we’re reminded all the more of the price that we must sometimes pay to maintain this stance...
  • In short – It requires a deep faith
  • Faith in ourselves, faith in our beliefs, and most importantly – Faith in God and in His promises
  • Integrity and character are born of moral courage... they simply cannot exist without it...
  • When we exhibit moral courage the world often takes us for a fool, just as it took Jesus for a fool... this is one of the primary reasons why Jesus was a stumbling block for so many...
  • Human wisdom simply cannot comprehend the dictates of moral courage
  • Jesus spoke and taught with authority – With moral authority
  • Moral authority gives us credibility with others… it demands attention…
  • Moral authority is a natural product of moral courage… They go together hand in hand… One cannot exist without the other…
  • From our first reading: “Before man are life and death, good and evil,
    whichever he chooses shall be given him.” 
  • Through the gift of free will - We each choose how we will live: And how we choose to live often determines how we will die
  • Free will is a gift unique to human beings – But this gift comes at a price
  • We’re each responsible for our actions and our inactions; and are therefore required to exhibit the moral courage to think and act upon what we know and believe to be right and justregardless of the personal cost
  • I’ll close with something that I came across many years ago while in the Navy – Author Unknown…
  • It makes clear that our choices in life matterperhaps far more than we can ever comprehend on this side of eternity
  • It stresses the value of nurturing and maintaining moral courage throughout our lives… and it ultimately charges us with taking responsibility for how we choose to live through the gift of free will
  • “We do not choose to be born.  We do not choose our parents.  We do not choose our historical epoch, or the country of our birth, or the immediate circumstances of our upbringing.  We do not, most of us choose to die; nor do we choose the time or conditions of our death.  But within all this realm of choicelessness, we do choose how we shall live: courageously, or in cowardice, honorably or dishonorably, with purpose or adrift.  We decide what is important and what is trivial in life.  We decide that what makes us significant is either what we do or what we refuse to do.  But no matter how indifferent the universe may be to our choices and decisions; these choices and decisions are ours to makeWe decideWe choose.  And as we decide and choose, so are our lives formed.  In the end, forming our own destiny is what free will is all about.”
     

Comments

There are no comments for this post.

Add a comment

Will not be shared.
Add Comment
 
Online Giving

Online Giving

Secure and Convenient Donate now!